New Cities Landscapes – Interactive Tweetography Maps

New York City - Interactive Tweetography Maps

New York City – New City Landscapes – Interactive Tweetography Maps

Over the past few months urbantick have been harvesting geospatial data from Twitter with the aim of creating a series of new city maps based on Twitter data. Via a radius of 30km around New York, London, Paris, Munich we have collated the number of Tweets and created our New City Landscape Maps.

The highest New York point is the Time Square Peak. It sits within a ridge running down the lengt of Manhattan. It drops of in the south shortly after Chinatown Head and Little Italy Side. A second group of mountains are location around the Franklin Avenue Rock and a third in the Jamaica area.

The maps were created using our Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded bySteven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity.

The data is derived from tweets sent via a mobile device that includes the location at the time of sending the message. The contours correspond to the density of tweets, the mountains rise over active locations and cliffs drop down in to calm valleys, flowing out to tweet deserts. Throughout the emerging landscape features have been renamed to reflect these conditions. Embedded below a zoomable version of London, created using CASA GM Image Cutter software software developed byRichard Milton, you can zoom in and pan around just as you would do on Google Maps.

New York New City Landscape - Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / New York New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view.

London New City Landscape – Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / London New City Landscape - Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view.

Munich New City Landscape – Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Munich New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view.

Paris New City Landscape - mage by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Paris New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. This map was created with the support of Annick Labeca.

Geneva New City Landscape – Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Geneva New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity. (2011)

Seoul New City Landscape - Image by urbanTick for NCL / Seoul New City Landscape map generated from location based tweets collected over the period of one week. The area covered is within a 30 km radius of Seoul. (2011)

 

‘New York, London, Paris, Munich everybody talk about Pop Musik’ – that was 1979 and the catch line by the group M. This was the start of the project, to mine what people are talking about in 2010. This has led to the creation of our New City Landscape maps.

Images of the maps can also be found on flickr.

 

4 Responses to New Cities Landscapes – Interactive Tweetography Maps

  1. Result do seem really interesting, though I don’t actually understand the map key. I suppose the high “hills” represent places with high twitter actvity, right? If so, what do the percentages stand for?
    By the way, Twitter API nowadays allow user to download 3,200 tweets from his own timeline at most. Didn’t you have to face similar restrictions when creating those maps?

  2. Btw RSS feed link throws 404. I’d like to subscribe :-)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>